Tag Archives: Zhuang

The Embodiment of Hope

Today I’m over at Grace and Hope for Children’s blog, writing about my experiences working alongside their organization in China and the hope that their staff and the foster parents they support bring to children, their communities, China, and abroad.

I’ve written a fair bit about my research with foster parents on this blog, but without the support from folks at Grace and Hope none of it would have been possible!  They’re a great organization that are supporting the work of foster care in China, which is so important.  You can learn more about their organization via their website, or you can read the post below and click over to the blog to finish.  If you’re joining us from Grace and Hope today, thanks for your support of foster families, and I hope you’ll enjoy browsing the blog for other posts about China, foster families, and faith.

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Nanning
Farmers on the outskirts of Nanning’s modern skyscrapers in the Guangxi Autonomous Region. All photos by Evan Schneider.

Nearly three and a half years ago I came to China hoping to do dissertation research with foster families.  I remember vividly the first few moments in the Nanning airport, where my halting Mandarin got a pungent taste of Southwest Guangxi’s linguistic plurality and thick Southern accents (yep, there are Southern accents in China, too!).  I remember not only this cacophony of languages upon touching down in Nanning, but also the pervasive smell of mildew, the sea of e-bikes stretching across the broad avenues, and my first forays through neighborhood markets searching for foster mothers alongside a friend who swore they could be found.

I met not a single foster mother that first summer.  Instead, I met many people, all Chinese, who told me, emphatically, that they did not exist.  Our research design is open-ended in anthropology, meaning that we spend a lot of time in the places where we study and live, and we often expect even the topic of our research to change along the way.  People who I met in Guangxi apologized obsessively for the “backwardness” of their region, and urged me to go somewhere of real importance in China.  Chinese professors of anthropology wondered why I wanted to study foster mothers, rather than the Zhuang minority culture, for which Guangxi is famous.

But oddly, for some reason, it never occurred to me to abandon the project.  I had this strange, absurd, yet resilient hope that foster mothers were out there somewhere, and that they were worth studying and worth knowing.  So my husband and I moved to Nanning the following summer, on a wing and a prayer.  And then finally, in March of 2011 in an unassuming concrete office, buried in the middle of the city, and through a roundabout network of friends and acquaintances, I was introduced to a small NGO staff who told me they supported hundreds of families in Nanning and thousands outside of the province who took orphaned and abandoned children into their homes.

Their name was Grace and Hope.  That April, in a nearby city orphanage, an elderly woman with a kind smile told me how she’d started foster care projects in Guangxi in the early 1990s out of necessity, poverty, and concern.  Guangxi, it turned out, despite the naysayers, and in no small part due to Grace and Hope, was at the center of a disperse, yet expansive foster care movement.

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The author with members of the staff of Grace and Hope for Children in China.

Keep reading at Grace and Hope for Children

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Guangxi Travelogue: Guilin and Ping’ an

My family walking alongside the Li River in Guilin.

Well, that China Bucket List of mine is getting shorter and shorter.

Not only did my Dad and my sisters make it to China, but we took a train ride back to the lovely city of Guilin…

My sisters and I on the train to Guilin.

where we climbed the sun and moon pagodas…

…and Diecai peak, from which we admired the karst formations cutting through the modern cityscape.

But then it was onto the rice terraces, where we stayed in the picturesque Zhuang town of Ping’ an…

The Dragon Back Rice Terraces.

…and hiked with our new friend, a Yao woman, named Xiao Pan…

Our guide, Xiao Pan.
You can see our destination at the top of this photo.

…to her village, Zhongliu.

The Yao village of (Guangxi) Zhongliu.

We lunched in Zhongliu on potatoes, green beans, and pork, and the walked back to Ping’ an, a journey that takes Xiao Pan one hour, but took us over two.  We certainly stopped to take in the beautiful views, though, along the way.

The rice terraces were a wonderful adventure, one I’m rather disappointed I waited so long to take on, but also one I’m also glad to have enjoyed with my family while they were in China.

My husband and I amidst the rice terraces.

Photos by Evan Schneider.