Opening Prayer

Here’s the opening prayer* from yesterday’s worship service that really spoke to me.  

The whole service did, actually, and I’m still mulling over the sermon and the challenges and that Bible that never ceases to upset the apple cart.

Fungi in the forests of New Jersey.  Photos by Evan Schneider.
Fungi in the forests of New Jersey. Photos by Evan Schneider.

But more on that later.

For now, just the simple gift of prayer.

Maybe you’ll use it to pray over your week.  Maybe you’ll use it to bless your table this evening before you sit down to eat.  Maybe you’ll whisper it to your children, your spouse, or your friends over the phone, as you ease into bed, or as you lay awake with worry or fear.  I don’t like that you might worry, but I love imagining how prayer is private, yet corporate, spoken both in times of great joy and great pain, inhabiting the many shades of our daily lives.

The confession in this little prayer made my eyes widen.  So often we are the people who find lack in the midst of abundance.  May we feast on God’s grace this week and find ourselves fulfilled, content, and brimming with peace.

Most loving God,
among us there are many shades of both strength and need.
We are the people of much knowledge who lack wisdom,
the people of many possessions who lack fulfillment,
the people of abundant technology who lack hope,
the people of pleasures who lack contentment,
the people of many comforts who lack peace,
the people of much pride who lack dignity,
the people of ideals who lack vigor,
the people of belief who lack faith,
the people of faith who lack love.
Whether we have journeyed a long way
or have just come down the street,
we come seeking spiritual food to feed our spirits. Amen.

*Borrowed from Seasons of the Spirit

Ballpate Mountain Park, NJ.
Ballpate Mountain Park, NJ.
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2 thoughts on “Opening Prayer

    1. My committee read this prayer to me at the close of my annual evaluation (for ordination) this summer. I can’t believe what staying power the words have, and I think you’re right–they represent our constant struggle, but it is a struggle to know God more fully, and embracing our brokenness tends to get us a little bit closer to understanding not only God, but also one another.

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